Book Review: Algorithms to live by

I finished Algorithms to Live By, by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths. I enjoyed it immensely.

The premise of the book is that computer programs make decisions with algorithms all the time. There’s math behind how they do so, including tradeoffs and time considerations. Human beings face some of the same decisions and there’s no reason we can’t use this knowledge to live better lives.

Yes, this is kind of a self help book—“you can live a better life by thinking like a computer”. But it’s math, folks.

I actually recommended it to my SO because I feel like she’d understand me better after reading it. I’m always talking about how much of the stress in our life is due to resource contention.

The book covers a wide swathe of decision making. Here are some examples of the broad categories and some specific references:

  • when to decide to stop looking for a house or a partner
  • when to explore new knowledge vs exploit current knowledge in the context of clinical trials
  • how randomness can lead to better outcomes
  • how caches can help you determine what of your wardrobe to keep
  • how overfitting warps sports like fencing

As illustrated above, this is not a book about theory, but is actually hands on. I don’t recall seeing a single equation, though there are graphs. And the authors do mention plenty of researcher names, provide footnotes and have a twenty page bibliography. So if you want to learn more about the formal proofs, the info is there.

It’s hard to choose just one takeaway from this book, but if I had to pick one, it’d be the fact that game theory shows that you need external forces to avoid the tragedy of the commons, and that emotions may play a role in providing that.

Here’s an excerpt if you want a deeper look.

If you spend any time thinking about how you can make decisions better, Algorithms to Live By is worth reading.


Book Review: A Memory Called Empire

I was at a bookstore the other day and was rummaging around for an escape book. I had picked up one book based on staff recommendation, but came across another that had won the Nebula. A Memory Called Empire appeared to be an award winning space opera novel.

I thought, why not, and picked it up. I was not disappointed.

There are two main cultures of different power and viewpoints. The action follows an new, unprepared ambassador from one culture to the other. The cultures are coherent and yet alien. Alien to each other and to me. Competitive poetry, internal reflection, and constant political intrigue define one culture. We get drips and drabs of the other, less powerful civilization, but you learn enough to be appreciative of their scrappyness and reverence for the collective.

The cultures are never described to the detriment of the action. The ambassador is dropped into a political mess and acts and reacts to help save her nation and herself. Whether she is trying to meet powerful people to negotiate for her people, reading correspondence, or escape danger, there’s no downtime. The entire book happens in span of about two weeks.

I also enjoyed the character development. Many of the characters pop in and out of the storyline, but you follow a few main characters for a while. You get to understand and appreciate the way they interact with each other. It doesn’t feel forced at all. At the same time, the “otherness” of the ambassador provides a constant tension which is understandable to anyone who has been dropped into an uncomfortable situation.

The plot revolves around a mystery. But even when it is unveiled, there’s still plenty of excitement, as a confluence of outside, political events ensnare the protagonists.

Some books are so good they keep you reading late into the night. This was one of them.


Book Review: Am I Being Too Subtle?

I recently finished “Am I Being Too Subtle”, which is a business book by Sam Zell. He is an American businessman and real estate tycoon.

I quite enjoyed the book. We learn a bit about his parents and upbringing, and then he plunges right into the deals. Some of the details are great (he was able to complete a transaction once because he found out the owner of the property had buried a favorite dog in the backyard, and added a clause to the contract allowing the pet to be exhumed). He addresses his successes (helping professionalize the REIT market, selling the equity group, the loyalty of his employees) and his failures (the bankruptcy of the Tribune company in 2008).

The single biggest lesson that I took away was that to succeed you need to be looking in places that others aren’t and that eventually what worked for you will stop working and you’ll need to change. There are other pieces of wisdom in the book, and it’s less than 250 pages. A great fun read if you enjoy learning about business and deals.


The Case For Space

Sunrise over a planetI recently read “The Case For Space“, by Robert Zubrin. It was great. Now, I have a degree in physics, but it’s been a long time since I did any math more complicated than algebra. So I can’t speak to the nuances of his calculations–I didn’t verify them. (A google search for reviews where people work through the math doesn’t turn up anything either.)

But I thoroughly enjoyed this overview. This book is in two parts.

The first covers where we are in space exploration now, and where the physics can let us be. He spends a lot of time on what we could do right now. But he also write a number of chapters on where we can be if there are scientific advances in energy generation (namely fusion). The author starts with low earth orbit (LEO) and then heads to the moon, Mars, the asteroid belt, the gas giants and beyond.

This section is a lot of fun. Zubrin covers areas that I never considered to be related to space (the power of transorbital flight to make the earth even smaller than it is today for travelers). He also talks about the economics of space flight and colonization. What exactly will the moon settlers or Martians have that they can sell? There’s a reference to a three way trade between Earth, Mars and the asteroid belt. I really enjoyed the details he dove into. For example:

“In the almost Earth normal atmosphere of Titan, you would not need a pressure suit, just a dry suit to keep out the cold. On your back, you could carry a tank of liquid oxygen, which would need no refrigeration in Titan’s environment…and could supply your breathing needs for a weeklong trip…”

The second part is supposed to be more inspirational, as if getting to space wasn’t inspirational enough. He covers various reasons (freedom, security, survival) that we should be getting off Earth. I found this section less exciting, but I can understand why he included this–if you aren’t excited about space travel for the adventure, Zubrin might convince you in this section.

There were parts of this book that dragged on a bit, but for the most part the prose is accessible and the math skippable. The real world plans that he outlines, especially at the beginning of the book focused on reusable spacecraft technology, LEO, the moon and Mars, are fascinating for their audacity and specificity. Recommended.


Book Review: Goliath

I recently read Goliath, by Matt Stoller. It was, I’ll be honest, hard going. Not because it wasn’t interesting or because the writing was bad. Just because it’s a dry subject and there are a lot of people involved.

The book is about how we (the USA, there’s really no coverage of any other country) think about the economy. Who is in charge? Big business, or people opposed to big business, who Stoller calls anti monopolists, and who most often act through government institutions.

The author starts with Teddy Roosevelt and the early 1900s, covers Wilson’s presidency (I had no idea he was so progressive, nor what an impact Brandeis had), the 1920s and the power of the financier and secretary of Treasury Andrew Mellon. The Great Depression gets some interesting coverage and we learn about how Mellon was almost impeached (he resigned before the House took up the matter). The anti monopolists were ascendant in the 1930s, interestingly in part because of fear of fascism coming to the USA. During the 1940s and 1950s when there was a pretty firm understanding that large enterprises were not good for the country. This was based on an shared understanding of the causes of the Depression. Then the Chicago school begins and starts to chip away at the intellectual underpinnings of the anti monopolist move. This combines with a re-imagining of the American populace as consumers rather that small business owners and farmers.

This accelerates in the 1970s, and the fed starts to rescue failing enterprises like Penn Central. In the 1980s the author discusses Michael Milken and how he ran the junk bond markets through a combination of market making and outright fraud. He also talks about how the savings and loans crises and the uneven unwinding of regulation affect the economy. He also covers briefly the rise of Walmart. Stoller also discusses turning points where the free-market philosophy could have been reversed, but instead, due to a lack of understanding of the monopolistic roots of the Great Depression, it is not. This happens with both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, both of whom came to power during economic downturns, and both of whom followed financiers’ advice. At the end he discusses how the intellectual foundation of anti monopolyism is being rebuilt, and invites everyone to join.

The book was much more interesting to me when it was covering earlier history. He threads a lot of it together by talking about Wright Patman, a Texas congressman who was a valiant defender of the anti monopoly practices and institutions that were created after the Depression (the FTC, the Justice Department’s Antitrust division).

This book, long and dry as it was at times, was important for two reasons. First, you have to know history before you can understand the current day. Second, there’s a lot of populist anger (justified in my mind) about the way that the Great Recession was handled, and I think that is shown in both Trump and some of the current Democratic candidates. I’m very interested in that anger being harnessed in as constructive a way as possible. I also think that it’s a valueable conversation to have about the tradeoff between economic efficiency and economic resilience. From what I’ve read of systems thinking, the way the US economy has been structured since the 1980s has been tilted towards efficiency, but is that the right answer? I don’t know, but I do know that I believe that the economy exists to serve society, not the other way around, and so if a democratic society wants to restructure the economy, that’s fine by me.


The Challenger Sale

I just finished reading The Challenger Sale, a book about consultative selling. I really appreciated its data driven approach. The book, written in 2011, outlines a new approach to selling that is fundamentally about bringing the seller’s business knowledge to bear to provide value to the seller. But not just value, value in a way that is both striking (something new the customer hasn’t thought of before) and that emphasizes the product the seller has to offer. An example they give is Grainger, who sells parts. Grainger did research and determined that a large amount of the dollar spend with them was for unplanned part purchases, which can be expensive in both purchase price and staff time. They worked with customers to take advantage of their sprawling inventory to better plan parts purchases.

They cover the different kinds of sales techniques that their research uncovered, as well as tactics to help people adopt “challenger” traits to become more successful. They also cover how to sell this methodology to front line sales managers.

Two things really stood out for me. The first is that every company needs to answer why their customers should purchase from them, as opposed to anyone else. This can be a hard conversation to have because once you strip away all the “innovation” and “customer centricity” sometimes you aren’t left with much. I know that when I was a contractor, I would have had a hard time with this–my best answer would probably have been “I’m trusted, available, knowledgable and local”, which kinda sounds like a copout.

The other great part of the book was at the very end when they talked about how these techniques could be used for the “selling” of internal services (IT, HR, market research, R&D). I found that really interesting in the context of larger corporations where some of the functions aren’t valued for strategic insight, but rather are order takers from the business. I have in fact myself been an order taker. It’s easy, but not as fun as being part of the strategic conversation.


Book Review: The Economists’ Hour

I recently finished The Economists’ Hour, a book about the rise of economics professionals in public policy. It focuses primarily on the USA during the 1960s-2010s, but it does cover some other countries (Taiwan and Chile primarily). It covers a variety of topics including monetary policy, deregulation, shock doctrine, and inflation. The book also focuses on personalities, from the more prominent like Milton Friedman to the more obscure (at least to me) like Alfred Kahn, and uses them to humanize the economic topics by framing the economics through the human beings who argued for and against them.

This book was a bit heavy going at times, but given the breadth of topics and time it covered, I found it pretty compelling. I lived through part of these times, but there were many things I learned, including the impetus behind US airline deregulation (the power of the airline industry relative to trucking and the success of intrastate carriers in CA and TX) and how Taiwan became an electronics powerhouse (a meeting over coffee and strong industrial policy). If you’re interested in the intersection of economics and government policy, this book is highly recommended. (Here’s a great podcast with the author as a bonus.)


Obstacles to building high availability software systems

Open sign

Is your system available?

I saw a discussion on a slack about obstacles to high availability systems and wanted to record the edited version for posterity (mostly for future me, as I blog for myself). Note that in any mention of high availability systems would be remiss if I didn’t mention the Google SRE book, which is slow reading but free and full of great information.

First, what is high availability? I like this definition from Digital Ocean:

In computing, the term availability is used to describe the period of time when a service is available, as well as the time required by a system to respond to a request made by a user. High availability is a quality of a system or component that assures a high level of operational performance for a given period of time.

Design considerations of a system that will hinder high availability fall into two categories.

The first category is actions that you don’t take, but could take:

  • single points of failure: if you have a piece of your system which is unique and it fails (and everything fails, all the time), the entire system’s availability will be affected.
  • missing or incomplete automation: if you need human beings to resurrect failed parts of your system, it will meaningful amounts of time and will be error prone.
  • failing to build in elasticity and scalability of resources: when usage increases, new resources should be automatically brought online. Failure to do so will impact system performance and that could impact system availability
  • missing or incomplete system instrumentation: if you don’t monitor your system, you won’t be able to even know its availability (until you hear from your users).
  • application statefulness (on the compute nodes): this impacts your ability to use elastic resources and to grow parts of your system that are under load. (If you aren’t designing a greenfield system, this may be an externally imposed requirement due to existing software.)

The second is in actions you can’t take because of external requirements on the system:

  • data sovereignty: if you are legally limited to certain data centers, you have fewer options for your system, this can hinder building the system.
  • tenancy: if you need to have single tenancy for security or legal reasons, you may have fewer options for elastic solutions.
  • data models and authority requirements: poorly performing data models can impact performance. If your application requires certain operations must be from the source of record (permissions checks, for example) then a poorly performing source data model can impact performance which can impact availability.
  • latency: if you have a highly latency sensitive system, then you may need to trade availability for decreased latency. Since availability often means geographic dispersion (to avoid disasters impacting multiple pieces of a system), it impacts latency requirements.
  • cost: high availability systems, because they have no single points of failure, cost more.

Again, this was a discussion from a slack of AWS instructors, but the commentary is mine, as are any mistakes. Thanks to Chad, Richard, Jon, Ryan and everyone else!


Book Review: Working With Coders

Woman with 1s and 0sSoftware is so integral to business processes and relatively inexpensive compared to labor that I believe every company is going to be a custom software company, in the same way that every company is an accounting company or every company uses paper. I happened on an interesting blog post and saw the author had written a book, “Working With Coders”. How non technical folks interact with coders is a topic of perennial interest to me, so I picked it up after reading the first few pages on Amazon. The book is written for clients, CEOs or project managers who are going to be working with developers to deliver applications that will provide business value.

Frankly, I couldn’t put it down.

The author, Patrick, is an engaging, opinionated writer. He breaks down complicated concepts into easily digestible pieces. Where there’s more to the story, there’s a footnote with a snarky comment or a link to more information. Patrick also provides nuts and bolts examples to show why something that seems simple to change is not (scaling text in a browser, for example). He also covers how big decisions like language, frameworks and library choices at the beginning of a project constrain freedom and choices further down.

Patrick covers what developers do, how they think, and why projects often fail. I thought his explanation of the benefits of agile development was darn good, and his explanation that even agile projects fail more often then they succeed was pretty depressing. He also discusses how the house construction metaphor for building software is just a big fat untruth.

I also enjoyed the section about testing in general, the various types of testing, and where they make sense. There’s also a section on finding coders, including a good explanation of why not to hire them as employees (you might be better off just hiring a development shop, depending on your needs). The chapter on how to deal with common issues (“the team hates each other”, “we’re behind schedule”) was worthwhile. His solutions won’t work for everyone. Maybe you’ll want to deal with these issues differently, but considering them before they happen will only help you prepare.

Of course, I also enjoyed the chapter on how to keep coders happy (continuous learning, quiet, a fast computer). In general the author is careful to avoid stereotypes, but does do a good job of covering common themes. I haven’t met too many developers who love working in bullpen environments.

I am definitely not the target audience. Neither is someone who is an experienced manager of developers. However, I am a subject of the book, so it resonated with me and I definitely found myself nodding along. There aren’t too many books I have wanted to distribute copies of (the two others are “The Hard Thing About Hard Things” and “Climate Wars”), but this is one.

If you work in a consulting practice with inexperienced clients or if you work in a product company with an owner or higher up that isn’t technical, reading this book will give you insights into their questions and thought processes. And if you can find a way to give them this book without being condescending (“hey, I found this book fascinating for helping facilitate conversation, maybe you will too”), both they and you will benefit.


Book Review: Beforelife

I really enjoyed Beforelife. It’s a whimsical stroll through a fantasy land that exists after death.  The main character, Ian, arrives in the afterlife with an unusual trait: perfect recollection of his life before death.  This leads him to be institutionalized, where he meets some madcap associates, including multiple people who think they are Napoleon and someone who thinks he was a dog.

The rest of the book is all about how this group helps Ian discover what’s special about him.

I enjoyed the plot twists, which I won’t outline because spoilers.  There are several other historical characters, some named (Socrates, Isaac Newton), others hinted at.  I also enjoyed the world construction.  The world after death is populated by immortals, with interesting ramifications for areas of study like science and social constructs like policing.

If you’re looking for a light hearted jaunt and you liked Douglas Adams or Terry Pratchett, you’ll enjoy Beforelife.



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