Remember “The World Is Flat”? For software development, the world is definitely getting more planar. I’ve had the privilege of working with a few offshore software development teams directly, and have discussed the practice with other engineers.  I wanted to share some of my tips. My experience has been in web development, but I believe these tips apply to most general software development. (If you’re looking for a tiger team/extreme expertise in a specific area, I’d treat an offshore team just like another vendor.)

If you can, pick a team that you have worked with before. Just like onsite software development, knowing personalities, strengths and weaknesses of team members is crucial to delivering quality software. If you haven’t worked with someone before, then ask for referrals and check references.

Pick an easy first project. This could be something not on the critical path, a rebuild of outside functionality, or a rewrite of an existing piece of software. If you have a prototype that you can point to and say “make it work like that”, that can reduce complicated requirements discussions. One successful offshore project I know of took a Cordova mobile application and rewrote the app in objective c and android java.

In general, projects that have a lot of iteration and experimentation are tough to offshore, because of communication latency.  You lose out on feedback cycles.

Have a working agreement. This can be an informal document, but you want to specify roles and responsibilities (who is releasing? who signs off on stories that have been finished? how does planning happen?). Make this document a living one.

Having regular time overlap can speed up feedback, to some extent. If you are offshoring to a country in the same timezone, this is painless.  If you are working with a team from an offset timezone, you may need to adjust your sleep schedule.  It is best if both parties have to adjust their lifestyles somewhat–it is more equitable. Record these overlap hours in your working agreement. Shifting my schedule to have a significant overlap doubled the number of feedback cycles (code reviews, questions) that can be made between myself and an offshore developer.

You need one person to own the relationship on each shore. If there are process questions, these folks sort it out. They can button up any lingering requirements uncertainties. They may pull other folks in to make decisions, but this pair owns the success of the offshoring relationship.

Leverage asynchronous tools. Make sure you use a progress tracker like pivotal or trello. slack is fantastic. So are the modern source code management SaaS applications like github and bitbucket. A live prototyping tool like Invision is useful. Record decisions in writing.

Finally, decide how closely you need to follow the code delivery. You may or may not want to see “how the sausage is made” This can be based on a number of factors:

* how much technical expertise does the onshore team have? Are they interested in acquiring more?
* how much time does the onshore team have? You don’t want the onshore team to be a roadblock.
* will the project be standalone (a marketing website)? Or integrated into the main codebase?
* is what the offshore team writing core functionality to your application and/or business?
* who is responsible for maintenance and changes after delivery?

Many of these tips are best practices that should be followed wherever your development team is.  But they are especially important when they aren’t in the next office.

Offshore development can extend your budget and pull in timelines.  It can help you build a better product, or allow you to access skillsets you might not be able to hire.  You just want to make sure it works.

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