Hipster Hosting at BSW, Tomorrow Only

Lady with computer mouse

She doesn’t look like she needs hosting, does she?

I’m doing a short presentation with a few other people at Boulder Startup Week on hosting. Tomorrow, Thur, at 10am MT.

Would love to see you there. Feel free to heckle.

If you can’t make it, here is the salient point of my presentation: startups are hard, so you should host your code and infrastructure at the highest level of abstraction that you can, so that your developers can focus on delivering business value through new features rather than doing ops. In practice, prefer hosting options in this order:

  • serverless
  • platform specific hosting (wpengine, etc)
  • general purpose PAAS (heroku, elastic beanstalk)
  • cloud VMs
  • colo
  • server in the closet

Of course, all advice is context dependent; my advice is aimed at small startups and the more flexibility your developers need around aspects of technology the lower on the list you’ll have to go.

Anyway, looking forward to a good discussion.


Boulder Startup Week Begineth!

Thumb upBoulder Startup Week is this week. If you haven’t been, it’s a great opportunity for a number of reasons. You can get a flavor of the Boulder tech community (though it’s worth remembering that there are numerous firms that don’t play in the startup world that are in Boulder). You can learn a lot about startups from folks who are actively building one, or have built one in the past. You can learn about new technologies and trends that are up and coming, including data science, blockchain and cannibis. And you can meet a lot of great folks.

I’m a bit burned out on startups at the moment, but am still planning to attend a few sessions, mostly on the development track. I’m especially excited for the Boulder Ruby Meetup on Wednesday, where experts will speak about interviewing. I’m also speaking at a session on hosting.

My tips for Boulder Startup Week:

  • go to at least one session in a different area of focus than you normally would.
  • arrive 5-10 minutes early and plan to stay 5-10 minutes after. Use this time to chat with folks. (This is hard for me, but I’ve found that having a canned opening line like “what interesting talks have you seen” or “is this your first time at BSW” is a good way to break the ice.)
  • the above tip will prevent you from trying to attend too many sessions back to back to back. This is a Good Thing(tm).
  • bring business cards, or prepare to exchange emails.
  • thank a volunteer and/or sponsor when you see them. There’s a tremendous amount of effort that goes into this week.
  • be prepared to help someone you meet out, with an intro, feedback on an idea, or even just an interesting article.
  • if a session is full, I’d get on the waitlist and then I’d show up anyway. Because every session is free, I’ve found that oftentimes folks are … over committed and there’s often space for other people.

If your interest has been piqued, please check out the schedule. Hope to see you out there.



Online teaching tips for synchronous classrooms

I’ve been teaching AWS courses for the past year or so.  Many have been with an online teaching environment.  This opens up the class to more people–there’s less cost in taking a course from your office or living room, as compared to flying an instructor out for an on-site.  However, this learning environment does have challenges.  Below is my set of best practices, some suggested by other instructors.

Pre class:

  • Set up your physical environment.  This includes making sure you have a fast internet connection, a room with no noise, and that your computer and audio equipment are set up.
  • Set up the virtual room.  Load the materials, set up any links or other notes.  I like to run virtual courses entirely with chat (audio conferences are really hard with 20 people) so I make a note about that.
  • Test your sound.  This includes having a friend login and listen to you beforehand.  This run through can help make sure your voice (which is your primary engagement tool) is accessible to your students.
  • Email a welcome message to all the students, 2-3 days before class starts.  Include when the class is happening, how to get materials, etc.  I’ve definitely had interactions with students from these emails that led to a better outcome for everyone.

During class:

  • Calculate your latency.  Ask an initial question that requires a response as soon as the question is asked.  Something easy like “where are you from?” or “how many years of AWS experience do you have?”  Note the latency and add it into the time you wait before asking for questions.
  • Ask for questions.   How often can vary based on previous AWS experience, but every 5-10 slides is a good place to start.
  • Answer questions honestly.  If you don’t know, say so.  But then say, “I’ll find out for you.”  (And then, of course, find out.)
  • Allow time for students to read the slide.  At least 15 seconds for each slide.
  • You, however, should not read the slide.
  • Draw or use the pointer tool to help engage the students and pull them into the material.
  • Find out what students want out of the class.  Try to angle some of the content toward those desires.  You may be constrained by knowledge or time or presentation material, but you can at least try.
  • Engage your students.  I like to make corny jokes (“have you heard the one about the two hard problems in computers science?“), refer back to technologies they mention having familiarity with, and talk about internet kitten pictures.
  • Remember your voice and energy are the only things keeping these students engaged.

After class:

  • Follow up on any loose ends.  This could be questions you didn’t get answered or more mundane items like how they can get a certificate of completion.  I had one student who couldn’t get access to the materials and it took a few weeks of bugging customer service reps across organizations before he did.  Not a lot of time on my end, but a big deal for him.

Note that I didn’t cover the content or particular technology at all.  They aren’t really relevant.

 


Railsconf Call For Proposals

Railsconf, a conference focused on, well, Ruby on Rails, is happening in Pittsburgh in April this year.  I attended last year and it was a fantastic experience.  I enjoyed the people I met, the problems I saw discussed, and the size and content of the presentations and workshops.  It definitely had a vendor experience (thank you, Heroku, for the t-shirts), but wasn’t too explicit.

Railsconf organizers are now accepting proposals for workshops, panels and speaking.  For some reason the CFP isn’t on the website, but I noticed it was announced via twitter.  I just submitted, so I can’t speak to the entire process, but the initial submission was pretty painless, just few sections on what you’re interested in presenting and why you might be a good fit.

They actually have a blind submission format, so I had to edit my initial submission to remove any reference to my identity.  Seems like a good idea.

So, go forth and submit!


Panel on Net Neutrality

I’ll be participating in a livestreamed panel at 7pm mountain tonight, hosted by Representative Jared Polis.  We’ll be discussing FCC net neutrality actions.  (They’re rolling back ‘common carrier’ status from ISPs as of today.)  (Update 12/12, apparently the reclassification is happening this week, not today.)

Please feel free to join!


Meetup talk outline

If you are thinking about doing a tech talk at a meetup, you should!  It’s a great way to deepen your experience, try a different skill and learn a lot.  It also has the benefit of making you a higher profile developer.

I was coercing a friend into talking at a meetup and he asked if I had any questions for his talk.  ‘X’ is what he was talking about.  (Where ‘X’ in this case was webhooks, but it could be any technology or protocol that is of interest to you.)

I rattled off the following set of questions that would be of interest.  I thought they might make a good template for any future meetup talks, so wanted to record them here for posterity.

  • what is X?
  • why does X exist?
  • what are prominent apps that use this tech?
  • how do you use it?
  • how would you test it?
  • how do you deal with dev/test/prod environments?
  • are there any gotchas?  Have any war stories?
  • how do you troubleshoot?
  • alternatives?  strengths and weaknesses of this solution or the alternatives?
  • any third party libraries that someone should be aware of?  How about tools?

What do you want to hear from presenters?


AWS machine learning talk

I enjoyed giving my “Intro to Amazon Machine Learning” talk at the AWS Denver Boulder meetup.   (Shout out to an old friend and colleague who came out to see it.) I didn’t get through the whole pipeline demonstration (I didn’t get a chance to do the batch prediction), but the demo gods were kind and the demo went well.

We also had a good discussion.  A few folks present had used machine learning before, so we talked about where AML made sense (hint, it’s not a fit for every problem).  Also had some good questions about AML, about performance and pricing.  One of the members shared a reinvent anecdote: the AML team looked at all the machine learning used in Amazon and graphed the use cases and solved for the most common ones.

As, usual, I also learned something. OpenRefine is a tool to help you prepare data for machine learning.  And when you change the score cut-off, you need to restart your real-time end point.

The “Intro to Amazon Machine Learning” slides are up on SlideShare, and big thanks to the Meetup organizers.





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