AWS Questions: Certification

Lots of times folks in my class are interested in pursuing AWS certifications.  The classes I teach are good at preparing you to be certified, but are definitely not certification classes.  Here’s the answers I give to students interested in being certified:

To get certified, you should review the page for the cert you want.  Here’s the page for the AWS Architect – Associate certification.

When I got certified, I re-read the student guide from the class and made sure I understood everything covered in it.  I didn’t just look at what the student guide had–I went to the AWS documentation as well.  I also read some whitepapers as outlined in the exam guide (found on the certificate page linked above).  I then took the sample questions (answers not provided, but you can find them via googling, anda again, on the certificate page) and then the practice exam (which costs $20, I believe, and gives you familiarity with the test format, but can only be taken once.).  Those gave me feedback that I was on track to pass the exam.

Note that the course is more hands on than the exam and doesn’t map strictly to the exam.  However, AWS does a good job of explaining what they are looking for in the exam guide (on, you guessed it, the certificate page).

Some of my students and colleagues have also had good luck with acloudguru, but I have no personal experience with that service.  The company for which I work (but for which I do not speak) also offers a course that is designed to help folks pass certain certs, but I have no experience with the course.

Finally, it’s worth noting that all the certs I have taken have been proctored.  Depending on where you live, you may have a number of test centers available, or one (or none).  Find that out before hand!  I also found that the exams I wanted were never available next day–I had to schedule them out a few weeks in advance.  YMMV.


AWS machine learning talk

I enjoyed giving my “Intro to Amazon Machine Learning” talk at the AWS Denver Boulder meetup.   (Shout out to an old friend and colleague who came out to see it.) I didn’t get through the whole pipeline demonstration (I didn’t get a chance to do the batch prediction), but the demo gods were kind and the demo went well.

We also had a good discussion.  A few folks present had used machine learning before, so we talked about where AML made sense (hint, it’s not a fit for every problem).  Also had some good questions about AML, about performance and pricing.  One of the members shared a reinvent anecdote: the AML team looked at all the machine learning used in Amazon and graphed the use cases and solved for the most common ones.

As, usual, I also learned something. OpenRefine is a tool to help you prepare data for machine learning.  And when you change the score cut-off, you need to restart your real-time end point.

The “Intro to Amazon Machine Learning” slides are up on SlideShare, and big thanks to the Meetup organizers.



Advice for the bootstrapped developer

I participated in a panel for Boulder Startup Week, but previous to the panel, thought I’d be giving a 15 minute presentation.  I was going to talk about rules for the bootstrapped developer.  At The Food Corridor, we recently celebrated one year of having customers.  In celebration of that, here are my seven guidelines:

  1. It will take longer than you think.  For any meaningful value of “it”. expect the process to take longer than planned.  Whether that is acquiring your first customer, building your product, finding help, or anything else, plan for it to take longer than you think.  Heck, this blog post is taking longer than I thought it would.
  2. Know your runway.  It’s important to know your financial runway (both for the company and for yourself).  This is fairly easy to calculate–just find out your burn rate and your money in the bank.  If you are looking at your personal financial runway, don’t forget to allow some buffer for you to find a different job–typically you won’t be able to step from a cratered startup on Friday into a full time job on Monday.  However, more important than financial runway is emotional runway.  Talk about the stress with your spouse (if applicable), think about the other emotional difficulties you may encounter, and plan for some high highs and some low lows.
  3. Extend your runway.  Again, for the financial runway, lower your burn rate as much as you can.  This will mean cutting back on spending and savings.  Make sure the family is on board.  Then you will look to find other sources of money to feed and clothe yourself.  This may include digging into savings, borrowing against assets (HELOCs work for this), borrowing from relatives, pitch competitions (TFC won two), selling assets, taking contract work, having a spouse who earns enough for the household, and/or moonlighting.
  4. Talk to your customer. This was one of the great assets that one of my co-founders brought to the table.  She had deep domain expertise and had many connections to potential customers.  We had numerous customers give us feedback, including via interviews, a month long beta test, regular product advisory councils and surveys.  You will note that this point implies you can find your customer and communicate with them in a cost effective manner.  Find where your customer congregates online.  If you don’t find a place, make one and invite your potential customers to join.
  5. Everything is borked all the time. In a startup, you just don’t have time to do everything correctly.  It can be embarrassing, but if you are building something that solves customer pain, and you’ve found the right early adopters, the customers will stick around.  Just keep improving things.  And accept a certain amount of brokenness.
  6. Know your market. This is related to talking to your customer, as that is one fantastic way to learn about your market.  There are other ways too–market research, online reading, etc.  However, as you build your product, you will surprised by what your market wants.  For instance, we thought our market would want a better UX, but were surprised when someone said our v1 UX was “great”.
  7. Make your own rules. Know that my advice and rules above are based on my experience, with my co-founders, product and skillset, in this time.  You need to do the reading and figure out what your rules are.


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