Since many financial institutions have standardized on it, I hear Java is the new COBOL. Whether or not this is true, if Java is to become the business language of choice, transaction support is crucial. (By ‘transaction,’ I mean ‘allowing two or more decisions to me made under ACID constraints: atomically, consistently, (as) in isolation and durably’.) Over the last five years, the Java platform has grown by leaps and bounds, not least in this area.

Java Transaction Processing by Mark Little, Jon Maron and Greg Pavlik, explores transactions and their relationship with the Java language and libraries. Starting with basic concepts of transactions, both local and distributed, including the roles of participant and coordinator, and the idea of transaction context, the book covers much old but useful ground. Then, by covering the Java Transaction API (JTA) as well as OTS, the OMG’s transaction API which is JTA’s foundation, this book provides a solid understanding of the complexities of transactions for Java programmers who haven’t dealt with anything more complex than a single RDBMS. I’d say these complexities could be summed up simply: failures happen; how can you deal with them reliably and quickly?

The book then goes on to examine transactions and the part they play in major J2EE APIs: Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), Java Message Service (JMS), Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) and J2EE Connector Architecture (JCA). These chapters were interesting overviews of these technologies, and would be sufficient to begin programming in them. However, they are complex, and a single chapter certainly can’t do justice to any of the APIs. If you’re new to them, expect to buy another book.

In the last section, the authors discuss the future of transactions, especially long running activities (the Java Activity Service) and web services. This was the most interesting section to me, but also is the most likely to age poorly. These technologies are all still under development; the basic concepts, however, seem likely to remain useful for some time. And, if you need to decide on a web service transaction API yesterday, don’t build your own, read chapter 10.

There were some things I didn’t like about Java Transaction Processing. Some of the editing was sloppy—periods or words missing. This wasn’t too big a problem for me, since the publisher provided me a free copy for review, but if I were paying list price ($50) I’d be a bit miffed. A larger annoyance was incorrect UML and Java code snippets. Again, the meaning can be figured out from the text, but it’s a bit frustrating. Finally, while the authors raise some very valid points about trusting, or not, the transaction system software provider, I felt the constant trumpeting of HP and Arjuna technologies was a bit tedious. Perhaps these companies are on the forefront of Java transactions (possible); perhaps the authors are most familiar with the products of these companies (looking at the biographies, this is likely). The warnings—find out who is writing the transaction software, which is probably at the heart of your business, and how often they’ve written such software before—were useful, if a bit repetitive.

That said, this book was still a good read, if a bit long (~360 pages). I think that Java Transaction Processing would be especially useful for an enterprise architect looking to leverage existing (expensive) transactional systems with more modern technology, and trying to see how Java and its myriad APIs fit into the mix. (This is what I imagine, because I’m not an enterprise architect.) I also think this book would be useful to DBAs; knowing about the Java APIs and how they deal with transactions would definitely help a DBA discuss software issues with a typical Java developer.

To me, an average Java developer, the first section of the book was the most useful. While transactions are fairly simple to explain (consider the canonical bank account example), this section illuminated complexities I’d not even thought of—optimizations, heuristic outcomes, failure recovery. These issues occur even in fairly simple setups—I’m working at a client who wants to update two databases with different views of the same information, but make sure that both are updated or neither; this seems to be a typical distributed transaction. The easiest way to deal with this is to pretend that such updates will always be successful, and then accept small discrepancies. That’s fine with click-throughs—money is a different matter.

However, if you are a typical web developer, I’m not sure this book is worth the price. I would borrow it from your company’s enterprise architect, as reading it will make you a better programmer (as well as giving you a sense of history—transactions have been around for a long time). But, after digesting fundamental distributed transaction concepts, I won’t be referencing this book anytime soon, since the scenarios simply don’t happen that often (and when they do, they’re often ignored, as outlined above).

One thought on “Book Review: Java Transaction Processing

  1. greg says:

    Thanks for the review. On the IT front, the book is indeed aimed more directly at solutions architects, though it’s been my experience that it doesn’t hurt for everyone involved with an application server-based project to at least be familiar with the issues that are likely to arise in transactional systems. There’s always an imperfect separation of concerns and we did try to point out ways in which, at least conceptually, the material in the book might be relevant to web developers as well.

    The book used HP examples alot because that’s what we were most familiar with at the time we started writing the book; Mark still works with the Arjuna software, and Jon and I have moved on to Oracle. I suppose if we had started writing it today it would use mostly Oracle examples… the important takeaway is that whatever infrastructure you wind up with, get to know it well. The idea that a common API set means all infrastructure is fundamentally the same is wrong.

    Thanks again for the review.

    Greg Pavlik

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