I’ve wanted to respond to this post by Kris Thompson where he predicts that “Struts will continue to lose industry acceptance as the MVC leader in the J2EE space” in 2004 for some time now. I believe this is happening already; if you read the blogging community or some of the industry rags, it seems like other alternatives to Struts are being promoted (not least of which is JSF). But there are still tons of Struts applications out there being built every day. There have been over 2000 messages on the struts mailing list for the past year (granted this number is declining–perhaps because folks are GFTFA [googling for the fcuking answer]).

This article explains why I continue to develop in struts: “A wider range of slightly inferior options, then, can make it harder to settle on one you’re happy with.” There is definitely a wide range of J2EE frameworks. In my case, these alternatives to struts are not inferior because of any technical shortfall, but rather because I have to learn them.

(An aside: I have programmers’ optimism as much as anyone else. But after a few years in the industry, I’ve realized that while I feel I can learn a new technology as quickly as need be, in order to really understand the pitfalls of a framework or API, I have to “build one to throw away.” I really do.)

Please don’t take these statements as a whiny “I don’t want to learn anything new.” That’s not true. But my time is finite, and the project deadlines are always creeping up. And struts works well enough for my problem set.

And that’s why struts is going to be around for a while yet.

2 thoughts on “Miswanting and web application frameworks

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