I finished Algorithms to Live By, by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths. I enjoyed it immensely.

The premise of the book is that computer programs make decisions with algorithms all the time. There’s math behind how they do so, including tradeoffs and time considerations. Human beings face some of the same decisions and there’s no reason we can’t use this knowledge to live better lives.

Yes, this is kind of a self help book—“you can live a better life by thinking like a computer”. But it’s math, folks.

I actually recommended it to my SO because I feel like she’d understand me better after reading it. I’m always talking about how much of the stress in our life is due to resource contention.

The book covers a wide swathe of decision making. Here are some examples of the broad categories and some specific references:

  • when to decide to stop looking for a house or a partner
  • when to explore new knowledge vs exploit current knowledge in the context of clinical trials
  • how randomness can lead to better outcomes
  • how caches can help you determine what of your wardrobe to keep
  • how overfitting warps sports like fencing

As illustrated above, this is not a book about theory, but is actually hands on. I don’t recall seeing a single equation, though there are graphs. And the authors do mention plenty of researcher names, provide footnotes and have a twenty page bibliography. So if you want to learn more about the formal proofs, the info is there.

It’s hard to choose just one takeaway from this book, but if I had to pick one, it’d be the fact that game theory shows that you need external forces to avoid the tragedy of the commons, and that emotions may play a role in providing that.

Here’s an excerpt if you want a deeper look.

If you spend any time thinking about how you can make decisions better, Algorithms to Live By is worth reading.


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