Sunrise over a planetI recently read “The Case For Space“, by Robert Zubrin. It was great. Now, I have a degree in physics, but it’s been a long time since I did any math more complicated than algebra. So I can’t speak to the nuances of his calculations–I didn’t verify them. (A google search for reviews where people work through the math doesn’t turn up anything either.)

But I thoroughly enjoyed this overview. This book is in two parts.

The first covers where we are in space exploration now, and where the physics can let us be. He spends a lot of time on what we could do right now. But he also write a number of chapters on where we can be if there are scientific advances in energy generation (namely fusion). The author starts with low earth orbit (LEO) and then heads to the moon, Mars, the asteroid belt, the gas giants and beyond.

This section is a lot of fun. Zubrin covers areas that I never considered to be related to space (the power of transorbital flight to make the earth even smaller than it is today for travelers). He also talks about the economics of space flight and colonization. What exactly will the moon settlers or Martians have that they can sell? There’s a reference to a three way trade between Earth, Mars and the asteroid belt. I really enjoyed the details he dove into. For example:

“In the almost Earth normal atmosphere of Titan, you would not need a pressure suit, just a dry suit to keep out the cold. On your back, you could carry a tank of liquid oxygen, which would need no refrigeration in Titan’s environment…and could supply your breathing needs for a weeklong trip…”

The second part is supposed to be more inspirational, as if getting to space wasn’t inspirational enough. He covers various reasons (freedom, security, survival) that we should be getting off Earth. I found this section less exciting, but I can understand why he included this–if you aren’t excited about space travel for the adventure, Zubrin might convince you in this section.

There were parts of this book that dragged on a bit, but for the most part the prose is accessible and the math skippable. The real world plans that he outlines, especially at the beginning of the book focused on reusable spacecraft technology, LEO, the moon and Mars, are fascinating for their audacity and specificity. Recommended.


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