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Is your system available?

I saw a discussion on a slack about obstacles to high availability systems and wanted to record the edited version for posterity (mostly for future me, as I blog for myself). Note that in any mention of high availability systems would be remiss if I didn’t mention the Google SRE book, which is slow reading but free and full of great information.

First, what is high availability? I like this definition from Digital Ocean:

In computing, the term availability is used to describe the period of time when a service is available, as well as the time required by a system to respond to a request made by a user. High availability is a quality of a system or component that assures a high level of operational performance for a given period of time.

Design considerations of a system that will hinder high availability fall into two categories.

The first category is actions that you don’t take, but could take:

  • single points of failure: if you have a piece of your system which is unique and it fails (and everything fails, all the time), the entire system’s availability will be affected.
  • missing or incomplete automation: if you need human beings to resurrect failed parts of your system, it will meaningful amounts of time and will be error prone.
  • failing to build in elasticity and scalability of resources: when usage increases, new resources should be automatically brought online. Failure to do so will impact system performance and that could impact system availability
  • missing or incomplete system instrumentation: if you don’t monitor your system, you won’t be able to even know its availability (until you hear from your users).
  • application statefulness (on the compute nodes): this impacts your ability to use elastic resources and to grow parts of your system that are under load. (If you aren’t designing a greenfield system, this may be an externally imposed requirement due to existing software.)

The second is in actions you can’t take because of external requirements on the system:

  • data sovereignty: if you are legally limited to certain data centers, you have fewer options for your system, this can hinder building the system.
  • tenancy: if you need to have single tenancy for security or legal reasons, you may have fewer options for elastic solutions.
  • data models and authority requirements: poorly performing data models can impact performance. If your application requires certain operations must be from the source of record (permissions checks, for example) then a poorly performing source data model can impact performance which can impact availability.
  • latency: if you have a highly latency sensitive system, then you may need to trade availability for decreased latency. Since availability often means geographic dispersion (to avoid disasters impacting multiple pieces of a system), it impacts latency requirements.
  • cost: high availability systems, because they have no single points of failure, cost more.

Again, this was a discussion from a slack of AWS instructors, but the commentary is mine, as are any mistakes. Thanks to Chad, Richard, Jon, Ryan and everyone else!

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