I remember the first time I looked at Simple DocBook. I have always enjoyed compiling my writing–I wrote my senior thesis using LaTeX. When I found DocBook, I was hooked–it was easier to use and understand than any of the TeX derivatives, and the Simplified grammar had just what I needed for technical documentation. I used it to write my JAAS article.

But, I remember it being a huge hassle to set up. You had to download openjade, compile it on some systems, set up some environment variables, point to certain configuration files and in general do quite a bit of fiddling. I grew so exasperated that I didn’t even setup the XML to PDF conversion, just the XML to HTML.

Well, I went back a few weeks ago, and found things had improved greatly. With the help of this document explaining how to set DocBook up on Windows (updated 12/2/2006 to fix a broken link) I was able to generate PDF and HTML files quickly. In fact, with the DocBook XSL transformations and the power of FOP, turning a Simplified DocBook article into a snazzy looking PDF file is as simple as this (stolen from here):


java -cp "C:\Programs\java\fop.jar; \
C:\Programs\java\batik.jar;C:\Programs\java\jimi-1.0.jar; \
C:\Programs\java\xalan.jar; C:\Programs\java\xerces.jar; \
C:\Programs\java\logkit-1.0b4.jar;C:\Programs\java\avalon-framework-4.0.jar" \org.apache.fop.apps.Fop -xsl \ "C:\user\default\xml\stylesheets\docbook-xsl-1.45\fo\docbook.xsl" \ -xml test.xml -pdf test.pdf

Wrap that up in a shell script, and you have a javac for dcuments.

One thought on “Relearning the joys of DocBook

  1. xml to pdf says:

    You had better be equipped to convert xml to pdf if you want to play in today’s world of web development. Adobe and PDF are about to take over the world. PDF is obviously the most universal and easiest to control. Plus it looks awesome compared to many other formats.

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