I’ve never really written threaded code in java. Sure, I took a java certification class long ago, and reviewed threading and probably wrote some toy code.

But it had always been one of the areas I was aware of but avoided. And it was easy to avoid–after all, I was often writing for a servlet container, and in that case you are supposed to rely on the platform (Tomcat, etc) to provide multi threading magic–you just have to stay in your servlet box. Other times, I was writing glue code where performance wasn’t an issue.

Recently, I was writing integration code that read from google spreadsheets (using the api) and quickbooks online (using the api) and did some calculations on the gathered data and created PDFs (using jfreechart and jasper reports). These PDFs then get pushed to certain folders on google drive.

I had run through some testing in my development and stage environments, and was ready to do a run in production. I started off the run and, after a few minutes, noticed that performance was not very good. About one report every 80 seconds or so.

Now, I’d run this process before I added google drive integration, and it had completed in a normal amount of time. So I suspected the google drive calls were the issue. When pushing the PDFs to google drive in my dev environment, I’d run into some connectivity issues, so as recommended I’d added a exponential backoff to my requests.

This meant that a lot of clock time was spent just waiting for the google services to recover.

So, an easily parallelizable task that spent a lot of time waiting? Seemed like a great place for multiple threads. I googled multithreading in java and found the Executor framework, which made running such tasks in parallel trivial. It even had futures and everything, and had been a standard part of the library since java 1.5.

I set up a thread pool of 15 threads, spent an hour or so rewriting and testing my file push code to fit the framework, and performance is much better. The push to google drive still takes about 20 seconds per report, but that’s a 4 fold increase in speed.

Next steps–use the spring abstraction layer to make the code more maintainable and clear.


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